Your Feldenkrais work is unique, and that's a blessing for your Ideal Clients!

To Get More Clients, Be Thankful That Only You Can Do Your Work

In Business by Allison

Your Feldenkrais work is unique, and that's a blessing for your Ideal Clients!

It’s a good thing that each of us has our own work to do, and that what we each bring to our expression of the Feldenkrais Method is unique.

Recognizing your unique gifts as a Feldenkrais® Practitioner brings you closer to getting more clients.

It’s not just that who are is a great person, a good friend, a patient listener, a competent practitioner, or a person with a unique life story.

It’s that your purpose is your own, and no one else is capable of doing what you’re here for.  If you don’t step up to the plate and do it — it won’t get done.

Think about it — Who are you here to help? Who are you here to inspire, give hope, show the way? How many people will not get what they need if you don’t do your work?

I’m guessing that you chose to develop the skills you have because they speak to an underlying desire to be of service. The funny thing is that most of us in the helping professions get into our work because we need it ourselves.

Whether you do Feldenkrais® work, Yoga Therapy, or any of the hundreds of modalities available on the planet today, I’m sure that what you learned to do in your training program spoke directly to you, and that’s why you’re passionate about helping others with it.

When you understand the deep places your work touches, you understand the connection your clients need to make with your work in order to get what they came for.

There are so many people on the planet who need help, that it will take all of us to connect with them in a way that makes a difference.

So, be thankful that no one else can do your work! It pushes you to continue on your own path of growth, it gives you a livelihood, and it gives the people who need you hope they wouldn’t have without you.

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“There are teachers in this world, without whom, it would be even less cheerful than it is.” — Moshe Feldenkrais, in The Case of Nora, p. 8